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PROGRAMME DETAILS

Thursday          Friday          Saturday          Sunday

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31
02:00-03:00 pm The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: The Year in Review (Oxford)
The panel looks back over the past year since the previous World Fantasy Convention and discusses the highs and lows that have happened within the genre.
David Bradley, Ellen Datlow, David G. Hartwell, Jonathan Strahan, Liza Groen Trombi (mod.), Gary K. Wolfe.
02:00-03:00 pm "Machen@150" An Introduction to Arthur Machen: The Flower-Tunicked Priest of Nightmare (Cambridge)
As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of influential Welsh fantasist Arthur Machen (aka Arthur Llewellyn Jones, 1863-1947), the author's biographer and a panel of experts offer an overview of Machen's life and the enduring influence of his work.
Peter Atkins, Tessa Farmer, Gwilym Games, James Machin, R.B. Russell (mod.), Mark Valentine.
02:00-03:00 pm "The Next Generation" I Lurve Fantasy: Is There a Place for Genre Fiction in Romance? (Hall 4)
Over the past several years romantic and erotic writers have swamped the fantasy and horror markets with genre books aimed specifically at romance readers. Although the “paranormal romance”, “urban fantasy” and “steampunk” sub-genres still sell well, are they not just the illegitimate offspring of “real” genre themes and, as such, nothing more than another passing fad?
Keri Arthur, Mike Carey, Michelle Drew (mod.), Nancy Holder, Stéphane Marsan, Suzanne McLeod.
 
03:00-04:00 pm Living in the Past: Writing Historical Fantasy (Oxford)
When writing historical fantasy, how important is it to stick to the facts, or is the past fair game for authors of fantastic fiction to manipulate how they wish?
Aidan Harte, Helen Marshall (mod.), Sophia McDougall, Mark Charan Newton, Tim Powers, Kari Sperring.
03:00-04:00 pm "The Next Generation" Thanks for the Memories (Cambridge)
It's been a brutal year for losing people from the genre. With input from the audience encouraged, the panel recalls the lives and works of a number of writers and others who made significant contributions to our field, including Iain M. Banks, Basil Copper, Harry Harrison, Ray Harryhausen, James Herbert, Jack Vance, Frederik Pohl and of course, our own Guest of Honour, Richard Matheson.
Scott Edelman, Roz Kaveney, Kim Newman, Rodger Turner (mod.), Gary K. Wolfe.
03:00-04:00 pm The Devil is in the Details: When Does Copy Editing Go Too Far? (Hall 4)
Most authors are happy to be copy-edited, but sometimes the copy editor can go too far and re-write a work so that even its creator no longer recognises it. Here's the how and how-not-to copy edit, and why it is so important.
Ramsey Campbell, Jo Fletcher, Laurel Anne Hill (mod.), Oliver Johnson, David Moore, Rina Weisman.
 
04:00-05:00 pm "The Next Generation" Strip Search (Oxford)
Comic books and graphic novels have never been hotter-you can't go see a Hollywood blockbuster these days without it having been based on some kind of illustrated narrative. Meanwhile, a whole new generation of fiction writers are making the transition to the graphic medium and, in some cases, reviving the beloved characters of their youth. So what's hot and what's not in comics, and how do you put a new twist on an old idea?
Mike Carey, Mike Chinn, Neil Gaiman, Christopher Golden (mod.), Joe Hill, Maura McHugh.
04:00-05:00 pm "Machen@150" The Landscape of the Fantastic (Cambridge)
The landscape of country and city is such an overwhelming presence in Arthur Machen's work they almost become characters in their own right. The author's love of his Welsh Homeland and the City of London mingle together in a unique manner in his stories. How have other authors managed the same themes, and is Machen's approach perhaps a practical model for the modern author?
Ramsey Campbell, Alison Littlewood, Adam Nevill (mod.), Samantha Shannon, Simon Kurt Unsworth.
04:00-05:00 pm "The Next Generation" Foxed, Slightly Bumped and Needs Recharging… (Hall 4)
Many of us still collect books. We even sometimes get the author to scribble their name inside them. But what is our fascination with collecting books and other memorabilia, and is the rise of print-on-demand and electronic media about to kill off the collectors' market forever?
Justin Ackroyd (mod.), Peter Crowther, Greg Ketter, Robert S. Knowlton, Padre Allen Lewis, Michael Walsh.
 
05:00-06:00 pm He Was Legend: A Tribute to Richard Matheson (Oxford)
Richard Burton Matheson died on June 23, 2013, at the age of 87. The panel celebrates the life and work of our Honorary Guest of Honour and one of the most influential writers the genre has ever known.
Jason V. Brock (mod.), Ramsey Campbell, Joe Hill, Richard Christian Matheson, Diana Mullen, William F. Nolan.
05:00-06:00 pm "The Next Generation" Does Anybody Still Read Genre Poetry? (Cambridge)
Seriously, outside an ever-dwindling circle, does anybody really care about genre poetry in the 21st century? Is it an art form that as had its time, or is there still an audience out there for people scribbling away in their garrets?
Shimon Adaf, Alan Ashley (mod.), Jenny Blackford, Hal Duncan, Jo Fletcher, Neil Gaiman.
05:00-06:00 pm Buddy, Can You Spare an E-Reader? (Hall 4)
Is it actually possible to make money out of e-books?
Susana Arroyo, Claire Deslandes, Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Dana Hayward (mod.), Darren Nash, Adam Nevill.
 
08:00-09:30 pm The David Gemmell Legend Awards (Oxford)

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1
10:00-11:00 am Guest of Honour Interview: Joanne Harris (Oxford)
Muriel Gray (mod.), Joanne Harris.
10:00-11:00 am "The Next Generation" Difficult to Digest (Cambridge)
In the early 1950s, the venerable pulp magazines began to disappear off the newsstands only to be replaced by smaller digest-size periodicals. It was a shift that revolutionised genre publishing for nearly a decade and paved the way for the paperback boom of the 1960s and '70s. Can we learn today from the changes that happened back then, or are the days of the genre magazine now limited?
Brian W. Aldiss, Malcolm Edwards, Gordon Van Gelder (mod.), William F. Nolan, Robert Silverberg, Robert K. Wiener.
10:00-11:00 am Should You Always Judge a Book by Its Cover? (Hall 4)
For most readers their first introduction to a book is the cover. It is probably the most important marketing tool a publisher has. So why do they get it so wrong so often? A panel of artists reveals how an inappropriate cover can seriously damage sales as they discuss their experiences working with art directors and publishers.
Jim Burns, Les Edwards, Bob Eggleton, Jane Frank (mod.), John Picacio.
 
11:00 am-Noon An Interview with Neil Gaiman (Oxford)
Jo Fletcher (mod.), Neil Gaiman
11:00 am-Noon "Machen@150" Machen is a Titan: Arthur Machen, H.P. Lovecraft and the Development of the Weird Tale (Cambridge)
In the 1920s Machen's fiction was discovered by a new generation in America. The most prominent of these now is H.P. Lovecraft, who proclaimed "Machen is a Titan-perhaps the greatest living author". How significant was Machen for Lovecraft's work and on other Weird Tales writers?
Nina Allan, Simon Bestwick, Jesús Cañadas, S.T. Joshi (mod.), John Llewellyn Probert, Darrell Schweitzer.
11:00 am-Noon All But Actors on a Stage: Creating Memorable Characters (Hall 4)
When it comes to writing-novels, short stories, scripts-you first have to come up with believable characters. So how do authors and scriptwriters go about creating an unforgettable character, and what are the tricks of turning them into a series or franchise?
Stephen Gallagher, Robin Hobb, Jasper Kent, Fiona McIntosh, Suzanne McLeod, Thomas F. Monteleone (mod.).
 
Noon-01:00 pm Guest of Honour Interview: Joe Hill (Oxford)
Joe Hill, Sarah Pinborough (mod.).
Noon-01:00 pm "The Next Generation" Size Doesn't Matter: How to Survive as an Independent Press (Cambridge)
While the number of mainstream publishers has shrunk significantly over the past decade, cheaper printing and emerging technologies have seen an explosion in smaller publishers producing limited-run editions. However, is this market now becoming unsustainable, and what are the secrets of running a successful independent press during these difficult economic times?
Peter Crowther (mod.), Simon Marshall-Jones, Sandra Kasturi, Brian J. Showers, Jacob Weisman, Ian Whates.
Noon-01:00 pm The Play's the Thing: Style or Substance in Fiction? (Hall 4)
Often an author will come up with a plot that is innovative, but fail to engage the reader with the quality of their prose. Other writers can use words and construct sentences that captivate the audience, but their grasp of storytelling is weak. The panel discusses the differences between style and substance, and how an author needs to master both to write successfully.
Pat Cadigan (mod.), Jack Dann, Ellen Kushner, Ian R. MacLeod, Geoff Ryman, Lisa Tuttle.
 
02:00-03:00 pm "The Next Generation" The End is Now (Oxford)
Apocalyptic stories have been around since the beginning of science fiction and fantasy. However, in recent years these themes have seen a resurgence in popularity-not least in young adult fiction-helped by the rise of the zombie culture and young heroines fighting for survival in dystopian futures. Why are we so obsessed with downbeat tomorrows, and are there still any new ways to end the future with a bang?
Kathleen Ann Goonan, Peter F. Hamilton (mod.), William F. Nolan, Samantha Shannon, S.M. Stirling, Tricia Sullivan.
02:00-03:00 pm "The Next Generation" Fangs for the Memory: Have Vampires Lost Their Bite? (Cambridge)
David J. Schow once described vampires as "the new Star Trek". However, since those heady days of twenty years ago, the humble vampire has been reduced to a bloodless version of what it once was. Now a staple of "paranormal romance", "mash-ups" and young adult humour, can the Undead rise again and stake their claim as literature's scariest monster?
Simon Clark, Nancy Kilpatrick, John Ajvide Lindqvist, Kim Newman, Tina Rath (mod.), Freda Warrington.
02:00-03:00 pm Continued Next Episode… (Hall 4)
Writing for series TV.
Brian Clemens, Stephen Gallagher (mod.), Richard Christian Matheson, Sarah Pinborough, David Pirie, Robert Shearman.
 
03:00-04:00 pm Sir Terry Pratchett-In Conversation (Oxford)
201o World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Terry Pratchett talks about his life and career and reads from his forthcoming 40th Discworld novel, Raising Steam.
Rod Brown, Terry Pratchett, Rob Wilkins (mod.)
[Please note that, regrettably, Terry is unable to sign any autographs. We politely ask you to respect his wishes.]
03:00-04:00 pm "Machen@150" Arthur Machen and Modern Horror (Cambridge)
Contemporary British horror writers talk about the influence that Machen has had upon their careers and read some short illustrative extracts from their own work.
Ramsey Campbell, Paul Finch, Michael Kelly (mod.), Tim Lebbon, Adam Nevill, Thana Niveau.
03:00-04:00 pm In the Name of Another: Writing for the Franchise Market (Hall 4)
Tie-ins, novelisations, spin-off and continuations-these days the publishing industry is churning out titles based on movies, TV series, video games and even other writers' books! So just how difficult is it to work in someone else's imagination, can it ever be rewarding, and how does it really effect a writer's long-term career?
Guy Adams, Christopher Golden, Nancy Holder, Mark Morris (mod.), Steve Saffel, S.M. Stirling.
 
04:00-05:00 pm "The Next Generation" Not in Front of the Children: How Far Should You Go in Young Adult Fiction? (Oxford)
Sex, drugs, violence-open up a young adult book these days and there's a good chance that you'll find some-if not all-of these. Is this really what we should be teaching the younger generation, or is there an argument to be made that the earlier they are exposed to what were once considered adult themes then the better they will be able to deal with them?
Holly Black, Sarah Rees Brennan, Frances Hardinge, Garth Nix, Chris Priestley, Chris Wooding.
04:00-05:00 pm "The Next Generation" Broads with Swords (Cambridge)
Once upon a time the heroic fantasy genre was-with a few notable exceptions such as C.L. Moore and Leigh Brackett-the sole domain of male writers like Robert E. Howard, John Jakes and Michael Moorcock. Those days are long gone, and it seems that more and more women writers are having their heroines suit up in chain-mail and wield a broadsword. Who are these new writers embracing a once male-dominated field, and how are their books different from those of their literary predecessors?
Trudi Canavan, Laura Anne Gilman (mod.), Robin Hobb, Juliet E. McKenna, Gaie Sebold.
04:00-05:00 pm Qué? Lost in Translation…? (Hall 4)
It's tough enough writing a book to begin with. But what happens when that book is translated into an entirely different language?
Thomas Clegg (mod.), Angel Luis Sucasas Fernéndez, John Ajvide Lindqvist, Mathieu Saintout, Cyril Simsa, Michael Marshall Smith.
 
05:00-06:00 pm 2013 Life Achievement Recipient-Tanith Lee (Oxford)
Tanith Lee, Ian Whates (mod.)
05:00-06:00 pm "The Next Generation" We're All Bloggers Now (Cambridge)
Being a columnist or a critic used to be a skill, combining knowledge and the ability to write with insightful observations. These days it seems that everybody has an opinion and evolving technology has given us numerous platforms through which to make our views known. Have we degraded the true art of criticism to a point where it has lost all value, or are some of the best insights found online these days?
Mihai Adascalitei, Anne Billson, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, Cheryl Morgan, Kim Newman, Paul Simpson (mod.).
05:00-06:00 pm The Glittering Prizes: Do Awards Really Matter? (Hall 4)
It seems that these days everybody and their dog are giving out awards on the basis of general popularity, being a member of a group, or decided by a panel of judges. But just how important is any award to a writer's career, and is it ever ethical to actively campaign for your own work?
Elizabeth Bear, Pat Cadigan, Ellen Datlow, Tricia Sullivan, Melanie Tem (mod.).
 
08:00-10:30 pm Mass Signing (Oxford/Cambridge)
[Cash bar.]
 
10:00 pm- The Cabinet of Dr. Probert (Chartwell, 6th Floor)
Midnight Victorian psychiatrist and carnival showman Dr. Probert, ably assisted by the mysterious sleepwalker known only as Thana, opens his cabinet of horrors to present three tales of fantasy and terror for your thrills and delectation. Allow yourself to be drawn gently toward the witching hour by stories from Angela Slatter, John Llewellyn Probert and Reggie Oliver, and don't forget to look over your shoulder on the way out, just in case there's something there…

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
10:00-11:00 am Richard Matheson Video (Oxford)
Richard Christian Matheson.
10:00-11:00 am The Best of All Possible Worlds (Cambridge)
So you've come up with a cool plot, you've created some characters that the reader will really empathise with, and now you're ready to put it all together in a location of your imagination. Edgar Rice Burroughs had his Barsoom, J.R.R. Tolkien had his Middle-Earth, H.P. Lovecraft had his Innsmouth and J.K. Rowling had her Hogwarts. So just how do you go about creating a believable milieu with its own history, culture and politics? A panel of world-builders will tell you how it's done…
Hal Duncan, Robin Hobb, Ellen Kushner (mod.), Patrick Rothfuss, Robert Silverberg, Adrian Tchaikovsky.
10:00-11:00 am The Next Big Thing (Hall 4)
Can the panel predict the next big trends in genre publishing?
Hajnalka Bata, Jennifer Brehl (mod.), Julie Crisp, Tom Doherty, Kate Eltham, Michael Rowley.
 
11:00 am-Noon "The Next Generation" Are All the Best Genre Books Now YA? (Oxford)
Over the past decade the young adult market has seen a huge boom in genre titles and readers, in no small way helped by the Harry Potter series, The Hunger Games and the works of Philip Pullman and Neil Gaiman. What has caused this surge amongst younger readers, and can it be used to keep them reading into adulthood?
Holly Black, Susan Cooper, Neil Gaiman, Will Hill, Garth Nix, Delia Sherman (mod.).
11:00 am-Noon "The Next Generation" Lost and Found: Really Forgotten Classics (Cambridge)
We've all heard of books and films that have been "rediscovered", but what about those that really have been forgotten? With input from the audience encouraged, the panel discusses a number of titles that, in their opinion, deserve to be revived for a new generation to discover.
David G. Hartwell, Robert S. Knowlton (mod.), George Locke, Farah Mendlesohn, F. Paul Wilson.
11:00 am-Noon Not-So-Secret Agents (Hall 4)
The publishing world has changed immeasurably over the past decade-you no longer need an editor, or a proof-reader, or a marketing department. Heck, you don't even need a publisher anymore! So is there still a case for even using an agent? What do they do for you, how much do they charge, and why the hell are they so difficult to get? A panel of agents will no doubt tell you why you can't live without them…and how important is to have one when things go wrong.
Joshua Bilmes, Meg Davis (mod.), Ian Drury, Barry Goldblatt, John Jarrold, Juliet Mushens.
 
Noon-01:00 pm Guest of Honour Interview: Brian W. Aldiss (Oxford)
Brian W. Aldiss, Stephen Baxter (mod.)
Noon-01:00 pm "Machen@150" The Little People: When the Fairies Come Out to Play (Cambridge)
Arthur Machen lived in a golden age for stories regarding fairies, but his repulsive Little People are a million miles away from those of Peter Pan. In modern times Tessa Farmer has created her own malevolent fairy creations. The panel looks at how Machen and other authors and artists have used folklore, the landscape, science and literature to create stories of the faerie otherworld.
Tessa Farmer, Alison Littlewood, Emma Newman, Jana Oliver (mod.), Rosanne Rabinowitz.
Noon-01:00 pm I Just Had a Crazy Idea… (Hall 4)
How to sell spec scripts to the movies, TV, radio or theatre.
Peter Atkins, Paul Finch (mod.), Ellen Gallagher, Richard Christian Matheson, Debbie Lynn Smith, Stephen Volk.
 
02:00-03:00 pm 2013 Life Achievement Recipient Susan Cooper in Conversation with Neil Gaiman (Oxford)
Susan Cooper, Neil Gaiman
02:00-03:00 pm "Machen@150" The Last Golden Age? Masters of Edwardian Fantasy (Cambridge)
Arthur Machen, Lord Dunsany, Algernon Blackwood, M.R. James and William Hope Hodgson-these Edwardian writers helped influence the future of modern fantasy and horror. The panel discuss Machen's friendship and differences/similarities with each writer and the cultural changes that followed the First World War.
Jonathan Aycliffe, S.T. Joshi (mod.), Michael Kelly, Reggie Oliver, Robert Lloyd Parry, Cyril Simsa.
02:00-03:00 pm "The Next Generation" A Book by Any Other Name? (Hall 4)
Are reports of the death of print media premature? As the number of electronic platforms and readers continue to multiply, and e-books are becoming increasing popular and more important to publishers' profits, how is the growth of electronic publishing affecting the literature and is there still a place for the printed volume in the modern world?
Irene Gallo, Marc Gascoigne, Stéphane Marsan, Darren Nash (mod.), Duncan Proudfoot, Jürgen Snoeren.
 
03:00-04:00 pm Nifty Shades of Fae (Oxford)
From Grimm to Once Upon a Time, we are seeing a resurgence of interest in classical fairy tales. What is our continued fascination with these kinds of stories, and how do they still resonate with today's audiences?
James Barclay (mod.), Lisa L. Hannett, Joanne Harris, Graham Joyce, Tanith Lee, Angela Slatter.
03:00-04:00 pm "The Next Generation" Steam Punk'd (Cambridge)
These days "Steampunk" is one of the hottest "new" genres in publishing, but in fact it actually dates back to the late 1970s and '80s. The originators of the term recall how the sub-genre originally came about and discuss how the concept has been taken up by a new generation of writers.
John Berlyne (mod.), James P. Blaylock, K.W. Jeter, Tim Powers.
03:00-04:00 pm What Else Have You Got? (Hall 4)
What do editors and publishers never want to see again?
Jo Fletcher, Gordon Van Gelder, Lee Harris (mod.), Bella Pagan, Gillian Redfearn, Simon Taylor.
 
04:00-05:00 pm Guest of Honour Interview: Richard Christian Matheson (Oxford)
Peter Atkins (mod.), Richard Christian Matheson.
04:00-05:00 pm "Machen@150" From 'The Bowmen' to The Angel of Mons-When Fantasy and Reality Merge (Cambridge)
In the midst of the First World War, the incredible myth of the Angels of Mons saving the British Army spread like wildfire. The panel looks at how Arthur Machen's story 'The Bowmen' created a mythology which still lives on today and also considers how authors manage when the borderlands between fiction and truth blur.
Simon Clark, Tim Lebbon, Fiona McIntosh, Mark Valentine, Stephen Volk (mod.), Conrad Williams.
04:00-05:00 pm If You Can't Write, Edit an Anthology (Hall 4)
Anybody can edit an anthology, right? You just get a bunch of stories together and throw them together in a book. It really doesn't take much skill at all, and it's sure better than having to sit down and writing all those words in a novel. A panel of esteemed anthologists explain why there may actually be more to editing than that.
Ellen Datlow, Hugh Lamb, Jonathan Oliver, Charles Prepolec (mod.), Jonathan Strahan, David A. Sutton.
 
05:00-06:00 pm "The Next Generation" Elvish Has Left the Building (Oxford)
Is traditional fantasy finally over? After all these years, could it be in danger of running out of imagination and becoming simply a parody of itself, or will there always be ways of re-inventing the genre for a new generation?
Joe Abercrombie, Trudi Canavan, Scott Lynch, Stan Nicholls (mod.), Adrian Stone, Tad Williams.
05:00-06:00 pm "The Next Generation" The Stars Their Destinations: Does Science Fiction Have a Future? (Cambridge)
We've come a long way from Jules Verne and H.G Wells. Or even Robert A. Heinlein and John Wyndham, for that matter. The future is now-we are already living in the second decade of Arthur C. Clarke's 21st century, and advances in science and technology regularly surpass what science fiction authors used to predict. So what are the prospects for scientific extrapolation? Will there always be new worlds to conquer, new frontiers to explore, or are audiences' growing hunger for all things fantasy and horror a sign that there is nowhere left for science to boldly go in genre fiction…?
Brian W. Aldiss, Stephen Baxter, Jaine Fenn (mod.), Joe Haldeman, Peter F. Hamilton, Paul McAuley.
05:00-06:00 pm The Mainstream and Us (Hall 4)
Is it still the case that when it comes to the genres the exception is the rule? Despite critical and commercial success, genre fiction continues to be looked down upon or even dismissed by the mainstream. Yet there are signs that some critics and literary publishers are beginning to accept-and even embrace-our field. Is the tide finally turning, or are authors and readers still forced to differentiate between obvious genre books and mainstream titles that are, in fact, genre under a different guise?
Muriel Gray, Joanne Harris, Graham Joyce, Roz Kaveney (mod.), Michael Marshall Smith, Amish Tripathi.
 
08:00-09:00 pm The Thin White Baron: Peter Cushing @ 100 (Hall 4)
The panel celebrates the centenary of the birth of Peter Wilton Cushing (1913-94) by discussing their favourite films featuring the British actor, whose iconic roles included Baron Frankenstein, Dr. Van Helsing, Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Who and Grand Moff Tarkin in Star Wars.
Anne Billson, Nancy Kilpatrick, Kim Newman, John Llewellyn Probert, Uwe Sommerlad, Stephen Volk (mod.).
08:00-09:00 pm Allen Ashley's Poetry Showcase (Library)
A round-robin style reading featuring both new and unpublished poets as well as award-winning veterans.
 
09:00-11:00 pm
[approx.]
Oh, Whistle…Two Ghost Stories by M.R. James, Performed by Robert Lloyd Parry (Oxford)
M.R. James is acknowledged as the master of the English Ghost Story. He first performed his supernatural tales to friends at Christmas in King's College, Cambridge. Now Nunkie Theatre Company have brought two of these unforgettable spine-chillers back to life. 'Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad'-a tale of nocturnal horror on the Suffolk coast-is considered by many to be James' masterpiece. It is beautifully complemented here by 'The Ash Tree', a story of witchcraft and vengeance down the generations.
Robert Lloyd Parry.
[Please note that there will be a short intermission between the two stories.]
 
11:00 pm-12:30 am Dr. Probert's House of Horrors (Chartwell, 6th Floor)
Dr. Probert returns, and this time his assistant Thana has a battered deck of Tarot cards to help him introduce three more tales of fantasy and horror to guide you gently towards midnight. Take care as expert practitioners of the macabre Alison Littlewood, Thana Niveau and Ramsey Campbell do their best to assure you that there really are things out there in the shadows waiting to follow you home…

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3
10:00-11:00 am "The Next Generation" Haunters of the Dark: When Did H.P. Lovecraft Become a Franchise? (Cambridge)
Howard Philips Lovecraft was probably the most important and influential author of supernatural fiction in the 20th century. Many of his tales are set in the fear-haunted towns of an imaginary area of Massachusetts, or in the cosmic vistas that exist beyond space and time. Although he has always had his imitators, in recent years his relatively small body of work has spawned a world-wide industry of anthologies, sequels, tie-ins, games and movies based on his concepts. How relevant are these new works to Lovecraft's original cosmic vision, and what would he think of this new breed of imitators?
Martin Andersson, Ramsey Campbell, S.T. Joshi, Steve Saffel (mod.), Darrell Schweitzer, Charles Stross.
10:00-11:00 am "The Next Generation" California Sorcery (Hall 4)
From the early 1950s to the mid-1960s a remarkable group of writers came together in the Los Angeles area and made their mark on literature, films and TV. This loose association included Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, Charles Beaumont, Rod Serling, William F. Nolan, George Clayton Johnson, Robert Bloch, Ray Russell, Jerry Sohl and Harlan Ellison, to name only a few. How did this creative confluence come about, and what is it about the West Coast that continues to attract writers, artists and film-makers today?
Peter Atkins (mod.), Nancy Holder, Richard Christian Matheson, Terence McVicker, William F. Nolan, Tad Williams.
 
11:00 am-Noon Coming Up Short (Cambridge)
Is it possible for anyone to still make a living writing only short fiction?
Ellen Klages, Richard Christian Matheson, John Llewellyn Probert (mod.), Lynda E. Rucker. Robert Shearman, Steve Rasnic Tem.
11:00 am-Noon By Any Other Name: What Makes an Author Change Their Byline? (Hall 4)
These days even J.K. Rowling is doing it with a pseudonymous crime novel! Is it always a good idea when an author publishes their work under a different name? Is this solely a creative or marketing decision, or are there other reasons-and repercussions-when writers allow their work to appear under an alias?
Janine Ashbless [Keris McDonald], Shannon Drake [Heather Graham], Jude Fisher [Jane Johnson, mod.], Daniel Fox [Chaz Brenchley], Robin Hobb [Margaret Ogden], Michael Marshall [Michael Marshall Smith].
 
Noon-01:00 pm "Machen@150": Sorcery and Sanctity-Arthur Machen and the Mysteries (Cambridge)
Arthur Machen was convinced that there was a mystical reality beyond the everyday. This is reflected in his stories, his fascination with the occult and his membership of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. However, this also contrasts with his innovative stories about The Holy Grail and interest in Celtic Christianity. How did these two sides of Machen come together in his stories, and how did his work compare to that of other "believers" in magic such as Algernon Blackwood, M.P. Shiel, Dion Fortune and even Sir Arthur Conan Doyle?
Gwilym Games, Robert S. Knowlton, James Machin, Tina Rath, R.B. Russell (mod.), Lisa Tuttle.
Noon-01:00 pm Please Sir, I Want Some More: How to Write That Difficult Second Book (Hall 4)
So your first book is done and delivered and you're really excited. But even before your debut magnum opus has appeared, your publisher is already clamouring for a sequel or-even worse-a series. Now you've got a deadline, peer pressure and a blank screen staring you in the face. How do you get started on that follow-up book, and are there any secrets other than just getting down to work?
Mark Barnes, Laure Eve, Snorri Kristjansson, Alison Littlewood, Lou Morgan (mod.), Sarah Pinborough.
 
04:30-05:30 pm The Judges' Decision is Final (Hall 4)
[approx.] The Awards are over for another year and-whether you loved the results or loathed them-here is your chance to question some of the judges about how they came up with their selections.
Holly Black, Thomas Clegg, Lee Harris (mod.), Matthew Hughes, Esther Sherman.

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