Articles • Audio • Awards • Best New Horror Guidelines • Bibliography • Coming Soon • Convention Websites • eBooks
For Sale • GoH Appearances • Interviews • Memoria Archiva • Movies • News • Other Contributions • Publisher • TV & Video
News
   2014
   2013
   2012
 • The Paperback & Pulp Bookfair
 • Chicon 7
 • Curious Warnings Launch
 • David Gemmell Awards For Fantasy
 • Ray Bradbury (1920-2012)
 • Bram Stoker Launch
 • Olympus 2012 -- Eastercon
 • The Flicker Club Presents Hammer At Vault
 
   2011
   2010
   2009
   2008
   2007
   2006
   2005
   2004
   2003
   2002
   2001
   2000
 
2012 News

Please Note: This newsfeed now continues on Facebook at Stephen Jones-Editor visit Stephen Jones on Facebook

 

October 2012

The Paperback & Pulp Bookfair
October 28, 2012, London

Photo © 2012
Stephen Jones, Les Edwards & Adrian Cole signing
Stephen Jones, Les Edwards & Adrian Cole signing

  •  return to top  •  
 

September 2012

CHICON 7
August 30 - September 3, 2012, Chicago, Illinois

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
The Morning after the Hugos - Stephen Jones and Nel Gaiman
The Morning after the Hugos - Stephen Jones and Nel Gaiman

As usual, I wasn't invited to any of the private parties at the 70th World Science Fiction Convention (Random House apparently hosted a nice cruise down the Chicago River, while George R.R. Martin held his own special room party on the Saturday night), but I still got to hang out with plenty of old friends and squeeze in several meetings. (Although there were a lot of people I never even saw, let alone caught up with!).

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones with Ace Books and Roc Books Editor-in-Chief Ginjer Buchanan
Stephen Jones with Ace Books and Roc Books Editor-in-Chief Ginjer Buchanan
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones with author and editor Scott Edelman
Stephen Jones with author and editor Scott Edelman

James Bacon and the rest of the team behind the (successful!) London in 2014 bid looked after me wonderfully at their terrific parties, and the hospitality was equally warm at the Baen and Tor parties on the same floor.

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones with publisher Bob Garcia
Stephen Jones with publisher Bob Garcia
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones with book dealer Greg Ketter
Stephen Jones with book dealer Greg Ketter

It might have helped if the Hyatt Regency Chicago had opened up any of their bars during the daytime (they would also have made a great deal more money!), and I wasn't all that impressed with the con (give me World Fantasy or British Fantasy any day), but I got some old books signed (by veteran publishers David A. Kyle and Erle Korshak), bought a lot more (thank you, Greg Ketter), and had some lovely meals at downtown Chicago restaurants.

And that can't be a bad thing.

—Stephen Jones

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones with artist Gary Gianni
Stephen Jones with artist Gary Gianni

  •  return to top  •  
 

June 2012

CURIOUS WARNINGS LAUNCH

Jo Fletcher Books launched Curious Warnings: The Great Ghost Stories of M.R. James with a signing by editor Stephen Jones and illustrator Les Edwards at the British Fantasy Society Open Day, held at The Mug House pub under London Bridge during the afternoon of Saturday, June 16th.

After Jo and her editorial assistant Nicola Budd had scoured London for copies of the book following a mix-up with the delivery from the warehouse (thank you London's Forbidden Planet), lucky punters could not only peruse a gallery of Les' original paintings for the volume, but the artist personalised each copy purchased with an original Jamesian sketch!

Photo © 2012 Martin Roberts
Curious Warnings: The Great Ghost Stories of M.R. James display
Curious Warnings: The Great Ghost Stories of M.R. James display
Photo © 2012 Martin Roberts
Les Edwards sketching
Les Edwards sketching
Photo © 2012 Martin Roberts
Jo Fletcher, Les Edwards, Stephen Jones and Nicola Budd
Jo Fletcher, Les Edwards, Stephen Jones and Nicola Budd
Photo © 2012 Martin Roberts
Robert Shearman, Val Edwards and Michael Marshall Smith
Robert Shearman, Val Edwards and Michael Marshall Smith
Photo © 2012 Martin Roberts
Stephen Jones, Jo Fletcher and Les Edwards
Stephen Jones, Jo Fletcher and Les Edwards

  •  return to top  •  
 

DAVID GEMMELL AWARDS FOR FANTASY

The David Gemmell Awards for Fantasy were handed out on the evening of Friday, June 15th, at The Magic Circle Headquaters in London. It was also announced that next year's Gemmell Awards ceremony and reception will be moved to October to form a curtain-raiser to World Fantasy Convention 2013 in Brighton. For more information go to: www.wfc2013.org/prog-gemmellawards01.html

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stan Nicholls and Stephen Jones
Stan Nicholls and Stephen Jones
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Sarah Pinborough and Stephen Jones
Sarah Pinborough and Stephen Jones
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Stephen Jones, Kim Newman and Grace Ker
Stephen Jones, Kim Newman and Grace Ker
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Robert Shearman and Stephen Jones
Robert Shearman and Stephen Jones
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Marie O'Regan, Paul Kane and Amanda Foubister
Marie O'Regan, Paul Kane and Amanda Foubister

  •  return to top  •  
 

RAY BRADBURY (1920-2012)

Ray Bradbury was probably the most influential genre writer ever. I was fortunate to meet him on a number of occasions and, in the late 1980s, I was a guest in his home several times. For many of us who grew up with his fiction, a world without Ray Bradbury in it is almost unthinkable. In memory of one of the finest writers who ever lived, here is my Introduction to the 2008 PS Publishing edition of The October Country. Goodbye Mr. Ray.

 
SEASON OF THE WITCH

"During the month of October, the Great Solar Wheel of the Year is turned to Hallowe'en (Samhain Eve), one of the four Grand Sabbats celebrated each year by Wiccans and modern Witches throughout the world."
          —Secrets of a Witch

 

The October Country by Ray Bradbury has always been one of my favourite collections of the author's work.

These stories remind me of the sweet smell of wood smoke on a northern wind . . . the crunch of an early frost beneath your heels on a chilly morning . . . the susurration of fallen leaves as you kick your way through red-and-golden piles.
Dark Carnival title page

But most of all, these stories conjure up the flickering fire-eyes of carved jack o'-lanterns and the rictus grins of decorative demons, window witches and grimacing ghosts and goblins.

Because this is the month of Hallowe'en. Our holiday. The night when the Dark Things come out to play.

I first read these stories when I was still a teenager—in my opinion, the best time to discover Mr. Bradbury's work—although all of them date from a much earlier period when the author, still only in his twenties, was honing his already considerable skills by contributing work to the "pulp" magazines, including the legendary Weird Tales.

Settling down under the bedcovers on a chill autumn night, a wailing wind keening mournfully outside, it was within these pages that I first encountered mysterious bone specialist Mr. Munigant, who understood Mr. Harris' fear of the skeleton that rattled inside him; or the pale grey thing that blindly floated in a jar in Charlie's shack in the Hollow; the unwelcome visitor that Dog brought back to a sick boy's bedroom; the smallest and most unlikely of assassins; the crowd of silent onlookers who always gathered at the scene of an accident and, of course, the wonderful Uncle Einar with his sea-green wings and most unusual of families.

Over the intervening decades, I have returned to these—and all the other memorable stories in this collection—time after time again. For this reader, they have never lost their power to amaze, amuse and perhaps most notably of all . . . to terrify. For make no mistake—despite the disarming poetry of their prose, or the tenderness of their telling, when all is said and done, these are horror stories, and the best of them contain a surprising twist or final revelation that is guaranteed to send an unexpected chill up the spine of the most jaded reader.

However, this beautiful new edition of The October Country is not quite the book that I remember reading. Back then it had already been split into two paperback volumes (the second entitled The Small Assassin), and confusingly contained a number other stories reprinted from Mr. Bradbury's rare first collection, Dark Carnival, originally published by Arkham House in 1947. When Hamish Hamilton reissued this title in Britain the following year, they dropped seven of the stories. Two of these were subsequently included in the first printing of The October Country when it appeared in 1955, and it is that contents that the present volume replicates. Therefore, this current line-up of nineteen strange and marvellous tales from America's premier living short story writer can be considered the definitive edition of this seminal compilation.

So now it is time to close the windows against those autumn mists, wrap-up warm as the colder evenings draw in, and allow the moonlight to guide your path into the night lands of Mr. Bradbury's dark imagination.

In The October Country nothing is ever quite as it seems—and when you have completed your journey through this disturbing domain, you may just discover that nothing ever will be again . . .

—Stephen Jones
October, 2008

  •  return to top  •  
 

April 2012

BRAM STOKER LAUNCH
19th April, 2012, London

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Dacre Stoker and Stephen Jones
Dacre Stoker and Stephen Jones
Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
Richard Dalby and Stephen Jones
Richard Dalby and Stephen Jones
I was invited to the Albert Embankment offices of The Robson Press/Biteback Publishing, with spectacular views overlooking the River Thames and the Houses of Parliament, for the launch of The Lost Journals of Bram Stoker: The Dublin Years by Elizabeth Miller and Dacre Stoker.

As well as many of the Stoker family being in attendance (from as far away as Australia), Ellen Terry's descendants were also present, along with such old friends as Stephen Gallagher, Richard Dalby, Tina Rath, Sylvia Starshine, Roger Johnson, Tony Lee, Robert Eighteen-Bisang, Tony Rudlin and others, including the two authors.

The thunder, lightning and torrential rain sweeping across London ensured that the evening had a suitably dramatic background to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Stoker's death.

  •  return to top  •  
 

OLYMPUS 2012 -- EASTERCON
6th-9th April, 2012, Heathrow, London

Photo © 2012 Mandy Slater
A Game of Thrones
A Game of Thrones
Photo © 2012 Peter Coleborn
Paul McAuley and Stephen Jones in the bar
Paul McAuley and Stephen Jones in the bar

  •  return to top  •  
 

February 2012

THE FLICKER CLUB PRESENTS HAMMER AT VAULT


QUATERMASS AND THE PIT (1967) Poster
Poster by Shiv

And so to the slightly spooky location of the Old Vic Tunnels near Waterloo Station on a crisp Saturday evening to attend "The Flicker Club presents Hammer at Vault". I had been invited to introduce a screening of my favourite science fiction film, Quatermass and the Pit (1967), in a converted crypt-like morgue that once served the London Necropolis Railway, built in the mid-nineteenth century to service the newly-built Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey. (For more about this, I recommend Basil Copper's Gothic novel Necropolis.)

Following a typically exuberant reading and effusive introduction by The Flicker Club's Clive Perrott, I talked to an attentive audience about my own history with the movie, some of the background details behind its production, and my memorable meeting with creator Nigel Kneale. I'm not a public speaker and, although I suppose it went okay, it was not nearly as good as it was in my head beforehand.

However, the highpoint of the evening for me was meeting child actress Janina Faye, who horror fans will remember for her appearances in The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll, The Hands of Orlac, The Day of the Triffids and, perhaps most memorably, as the young "Tania" in Hammer's 1958 Dracula. Accompanied by film director Norman Warren, she had been attending a screening of a restored print of that film, introduced by the redoubtable Kim Newman (who does this stuff so much better than I do).



We had a lovely chat, and when I bemoaned the fact that I would have loved to have her sign some of my Hammer memorabilia—had I had the foresight to bring any with me!—she very kindly produced a postcard depicting her and director Terence Fisher on the set of Dracula, which she autographed to me.

Also in attendance was Hammer's Nic Ransome (whom Michael Marshall Smith and I had met previously during discussions for an animated movie project) and Hammer expert Marcus Hearn.

As I made my way back through the graffiti-strewn tunnels to the tube station, I could not shake the feeling that I had left behind me the ghosts of those who would now never catch the train to their final resting-place. As I suppressed a shiver in the cold night air, I could think of a no more fitting location for a retrospective of Hammer horror.

  •  return to top  •  
 

If you find any errors, typos or anything else worth mentioning, please send it to webmaster@stephenjoneseditor.com.
Copyright © 2008–2017 Stephen Jones All Rights Reserved Worldwide